Pageant 2000: Picture Gallery

The Pageant leaflet.

The cast are addressed by Archbishop David Hope at the dress rehearsal.  [Photo: J. Cripps]
First performed in 1928, The Bishopthorpe Play, (later Pageant) was written by Canon Perkins and set against the historic backdrop of the Palace.  It aimed to represent, in theatrical form, the long and colourful history of our village, including the very first Roman settlers, the trial and execution of Archbishop Scrope in the thirteenth century, and the village of Charles I in the seventeenth century.  Since then there have been performances in 1930, 1954, 1956, 1965 and 1970 when it is alleged the then Archbishop had an unplanned part in the scene helping “riotors” gain access to the Palace. Nothing was heard of the pageant for nearly 30 years and indeed the 1988 publication, Bishopthorpe Remembered, speculated, “Will it ever be seen again?” Well, thanks to the efforts of the late Andrew Dunn and the generous co-operation of Archbishop Hope, it was, and complete with a new scene representing the village in the Second World War.

Few of us will forget those lovely summer nights of July playing to packed houses which included the Archbishop and the Lord Mayor of York. But more importantly, just as in 1928, it brought the community together forging new friendships and providing great fun for those who had acted before and those who had not, and ultimately helping to leave a lasting legacy, in the form of funds which have since been used to help various village groups and activities.

Liam Godfrey

Scene 1: 211AD. Thorpe on Ouse. A Roman Legion established a river fort at Acaster Malbis to protect Eboracum from ‘sea wolves’ approaching via the River Ouse.
Scene 2: AD630. Thorpe on Ouse. Wandering robbers meet a woman who acquaints them with the Christian philosophy of gentleness and peace.
Scene 2: AD630. The late Andrew Dunn, leading light of the Pageant project, playing a wandering robber.
Scene 3: In 1226 Archbishop Walter de Grey bought land and the manor house at Thorpe on Ouse from the Abbot of Kirkstall, Leeds.
Scene 3: 1226. Archbishop Walter de Grey addresses the villagers.
Scene 4: 1405. King Henry IV consulting lawyer, Sir William Fulthorpe at Archbishop Scrope’s trial in the great hall at the Palace.
Scene 4: 1405. Archbishop Scrope, found guilty of treason, is mounted backwards on a ‘sorry horse’ for the journey to Clementhorpe and his execution.
Scene 5: 1577. The Countess of Huntingdon prevails upon her husband, the Lord President of the Council of the North, to possess the Archbishop’s house.
Scene 6: 1633. Village children dancing in readiness for the visit of King Charles 1.
Scene 6, 1633. King Charles 1 entering Archbishop Neile’s grounds.

 

Scene 8: 1769, Enclosure of the common land. The woman who dared confront the Archbishop about where Gibbie the goose could graze.

 

Scene 11: 1940. The Home Guard.
The Finale: The cast singing, Let this be Bishopthorpe.
Martin Dudley remembers collecting his bottle of Pageant Ale from the beer tent during the interval.  See his comment in Pageant 2000 by Ian Hodson.

As Liam quoted – “Will it ever be seen again?”  It should be noted that, if anyone wishes to take up the reins, the Bishopthorpe Community Archive in the Village Hall houses extensive material relating to the Millennium Pageant, this includes administration and funding documents, photographs and ephemera.  An eighth pageant- will it ever be seen?

PAGEANT ALE: This may be an unlikely request, but – does anyone have a bottle of Pageant Ale they can donate to the Archive?

Contact Archive manager Linda Haywood to view or donate any pageant material: history@bishopthorpe.net

All photographs are the copyright of Roger Poyser unless otherwise stated.

Pageant 2000

“The tumult and the shouting dies,
The captains and the kings depart….”

On Monday 24th July 2000, I was the last of the Pageant organisers on site at Bishopthorpe Palace. The previous day, many of the participants had turned up and cleared almost everything away, but the toilets, caravans, rubbish bins and generators had to wait for Monday collection.

For me there were feelings of pride at our success, relief at our avoidance  of disaster and pleasure in new friendships made.

So much had been done by so many people from Bishopthorpe and Acaster over the preceding year. A grant from the Millennium Fund had been secured, use of the Palace and its grounds generously granted by our Archbishop David Hope, the script written, the parts cast, many and frequent rehearsals held. Individuals and businesses kindly loaned their equipment, their animals and their services. We had identified suppliers and contractors for insurance, security, tent, stands, bar, toilets, etc. Licences had been obtained for the use of animals, children, toilets, explosives…

There were, of course, unanticipated problems to overcome. Some were quite major such as the need for access through Chantry Lane construction works. Others are trivial in retrospect but important at the time such as my (it can now be revealed) locking out the Home Guard between scenes. (Surely their predecessors would have learned to climb over fences!) Even the last job was not destined to be easy. A generator was too heavy to be towed out of the sunken garden. A tipper truck from Chantry Lane came to our rescue.

The week itself was a triumph. The sun shone. After the first night we had full houses. The performances went well. About a thousand local people enjoyed an event in which about two hundred friends and family participated.  Over £17,000 was raised for the villages.

Ian Hodson


And here are some further memories of the Millennium Pageant from Anona Dawick

I remember David Hope’s warm acceptance of our presence at the Palace, his willingness to allow us free access to the ground floor rooms and the ‘stable’ facilities and his very effective prayers for fine weather on each performance. Unfortunately the spell wore off a few weeks later when floods after torrential rain filled the Palace cellars!

I remember the humour and dedication shown by all the participants in the enterprise:  actors, stage crews, costume designers, choreographers, and front of house alike.

I directed three of the episodes in the production. I was especially grateful for the help of the Manager at Murton who provided the costumes for the Roman soldiers and drilled them, marching to the chant of “sin-dek’ (Sinister! Dexter Left Right). My second scene was a 16th century scene involved a dancing routine featuring the Volta and a pavane  which were coached by Sandra Smith and executed delightfully by the actors. I also loved the expressions of the maids who were peeping through a window of the Palace to watch the ‘toffs’ dancing.

My third episode featured a performance by our previous vicar. It was based on the flood of 1892. and John Bettridge designed an ingenious  boat constructed over his own trailer so it could be wheeled over the imaginary flood water to enable the Rev John Keble and two church wardens to disembark up the Palace steps. Several weeks later they would have needed a real boat!

The Millennium Pageant was certainly a wonderful occasion which enabled the whole village to come together and co-operate in so many ways. Fortunately the performance was professionally filmed so we  still have the video to bring it back to life. My thanks to everyone involved.


So many people; so many memories. What  is your Pageant memory?   Add your own reminiscences by using the ‘comment’ link at the top of the page, or email me at ian.hodson@bishopthorpe.net

As well as sending memories in via email, when the Village Hall re-opens, written versions can be handed in to the Bishopthorpe Community Archive.  We also have the facility to record memories for the Archive if anyone wishes to contact us through historygroup@bishopthorpe.net

 

Bus Service 11 Update

First York are now operating a half hourly frequency service during the day on Mondays to Fridays, and an hourly service in the evenings and on Saturdays. There is no Sunday service.

See the First York website for detailed timetables.

We are asked to travel only if it is essential, and face masks must be worn.
Seating capacity will be very limited in order to adhere to the social distancing rules, so be prepared for buses to be classed as full even if they appear to have empty seats. Electronic displays and First Bus apps will show the current free capacity on approaching services.

Please pay by card or by app wherever possible. Cash will be accepted if it is the only option. Bus passes will be accepted at any time of day.

Passengers are asked to be considerate to people with prams or in wheelchairs.

If you intend to continue a journey by another route, check in advance. Some services have been suspended.

The Archbishops’ Auctions

 

Bishopthorpe Palace

It was not a simple process for an Archbishop of York to move into – or out of – Bishopthorpe Palace.  This enormous building did not come fully furnished and each new incumbent was expected to supply the premises with fittings and furniture to suit themselves.  Take, for example, Dr. Charles Longley who, in 1862, had only been Archbishop of York for two years when he was translated to Canterbury.  He did not want the furniture he bought for Bishopthorpe and offered to sell it to his successor, Dr. William Thomson.  If he did not want it, it would go for auction.  The Archbishop-elect found it difficult to make up his mind.  It would save him a great deal of expense moving into a large, fully-furnished house and, after all, as he wrote to Zoe his wife, “… we could replace dull carpets, etc. by degrees.”   He continued, “But what is still more important, we should avoid the most serious evil of an auction in the house, which would pull it about and soil it terribly.” However, after sending a “good man down from London” to inspect Longley’s property, Thomson decided to forgo his offer and put up with an auction.  And so, following extensive advertising in the press, the sale of goods began on 5th January 1863, and lasted for a further five days.  The public flocked to the Palace to view and bid for the contents of each room.  The array of dinner wagons, chairs made from mahogany, rosewood and walnut, sets of rich crimson satin Damask window curtains, four-poster and French bedsteads with chintz hangings was stunning. Also on sale were “superior copper articles” from the kitchen and furniture from the servants’ dormitories.

Front page of the 1891 auction catalogue  for Archbishop Thomson’s photographic apparatus and choice wines.

Soiled or not, the Palace eventually became home to the Thomson family where they lived for twenty seven years until the Archbishop died on Christmas Day, 1890.  Having lived in one place for so many years, and having a wide range of interests, Archbishop Thomson had collected a prodigious number of items. Despite his misgivings about Longley’s auction, that was how his sons and executors decided to dispose of their father’s possessions.  In March 1891, and with dealers arriving from London, the sale began at the De Grey Rooms in York with the 6,000 volume library.  This first part of the auction took five days to complete.

A further day at that location was devoted to an array of Dr. Thomson’s miscellaneous effects which reflected his interest in photography and science: A large microscope, two telephone transmitters, map measuring instruments, glass-plate cameras, printing frames, negative boxes and other equipment for a dark room which suggests the Archbishop may have printed his own photographs.  To this eclectic collection was added 1,000 ounces of silver, old coins, watches, and the cellar of choice wines.  That day’s sale alone totalled £889.

The venue changed to the Palace for the next seven days.  Numerous vehicles were engaged to convey visitors between York and Bishopthorpe where the items to be sold were displayed in the many rooms.  These included two grand pianofortes, a harmonium, and an extensive wardrobe of linen, blankets and counterpanes; outside were carriages, harnesses and greenhouse plants.  Biddings were reported to be exceedingly brisk and “fancy prices were realised.”

Whether, on this occasion, the “evil of an auction” left the Palace in a fit state for Dr. Magee, Archbishop Thomson’s successor has, unfortunately, not been recorded.

 

Linda Haywood, Bishopthorpe Community Archive

Sources:

Auction Catalogue courtesy of Explore York Libraries & Archives.  Reference: EPH/2/2620

Thomson, Ethel H., The Life and Letters of William Thomson, Archbishop of York, [London, Forgotten Books, reprint, 2015] pp 62-63.

The Yorkshire Herald, 28 February 1891, pp 1, 2

The Yorkshire Post, 3 March 1891, p6

The Yorkshire Herald, 7 March 1891, p2

 

War-Time Memories and VE Day Celebrations in Bishopthorpe and York

Ken Baldwin taking part in the 1954 Pageant but, in 1939 when war broke out, he was brambling.
Lily Foggin explains in no uncertain terms how tiring it was for her husband to be in the Home Guard and have a full-time job.
Carol Woollcombe  remembers meat rationing during the war.

It has not been easy to discover how the people of Bishopthorpe celebrated Victory in Europe in May 1945.  Despite the many interviews which have been held with residents by the Bishopthorpe Local History Group, the end of the Second World War has hardly been mentioned. While the war, as a topic, featured throughout the recordings, interviewees first remembered how life was lived:  When war broke out: “We were going brambling. We just continued, it meant nothing to us.” (a young Ken Baldwin); the Home Guard, “…he fell asleep stood up one day.  He was that tired.” (Lily Foggin on her husband, Reg); Rationing: “Dear Mr. Dixon, [the butcher] he was marvellous. He kept us going all through the war, you know.  Phoebe, our maid, once said, ‘Well, that’s been round the Knavesmire a few times’. The joint! But he was awfully good.” (Carol Woollcombe); and the Black-Out: “There used to be somebody about on their bike shouting, ‘Will you put that light out, please’.  Yes, some people used to do it for a bit of fun, not knowing the seriousness of it.  But we got over that, all of us.”  (Audrey Bastard)

Audrey Bastard remembers pranksters and the black-out.

In May 1945 a good many villagers were not to be found in Bishopthorpe.  Several were in the services spread throughout the world; some were still prisoners of war; some still fighting, for the war was not over until 15 August when Japan surrendered.  It was this situation which led York City Council to take a subdued view on how to observe the end of hostilities with Germany.  It was thought more appropriate that this should be a time of thanksgiving rather than celebration.  However, for more than five long years, life had been hard for people at home and it was time to let their hair down.

On Monday 7 May, tension was in the air as everyone waited for an official declaration that Germany had surrendered.  The announcement was not made due to US President, Harry Truman, accommodating demands made by Stalin.   The Yorkshire Gazette reported that the citizens of York used their time to decorate the streets on a lavish scale and the evening was spent partying with Canadian, French and British servicemen.  Two days holiday had been granted; most pubs managed to have supplies available and full advantage was taken of the fact that they remained open until 11.30pm.

The following day, Tuesday 8 May, rain fell throughout the afternoon and the city was strangely quiet.  Then, at three o’ clock, Mr. Churchill made the historic announcement that the German forces had signed an unconditional surrender.  Most people would have heard him on the wireless and, with the weather clearing, joyful crowds thronged the streets singing, shouting, and dancing to amplified music in Exhibition Square.  Crowds jammed into Duncombe Place to see the floodlighting of the Minster while the bells pealed for the first time since war began.

Many Bishopthorpe residents would have gone into York and joined the excited revellers.  But those who stayed behind enjoyed the village festivities too.  The only two people who provided their memories of VE Day were Margaret Smith, nee Cox, and Eddie Waite, both of whom have since sadly died.  Margaret, whose father was a sergeant in the Home Guard, told us of the bonfire on the school field where the Junior School now stands.  “I remember going up on to the railway bridge to see the bonfires round about.”

Margaret Smith saw bonfires from the railway bridge.
Former choir boy Eddie Waite enjoyed the VE Day bonfire on the school field.

Eddie Waite, a choir boy at St. Andrew’s at the time, also remembered with glee the same bonfire on the school field:  “The RAF from Acaster made it with old ammo boxes.  They also had wonderful rockets – military rockets – to set off.  Unfortunately, one landed on Mr. Hutchinson as he was walking home down Copmanthorpe Lane and set his mackintosh on fire.  Another rocket landed on Mr. Drury’s hen house and set that alight, but all the hens survived.”  Eddie didn’t tell us how Mr. Hutchinson fared but, we hope he survived without injury!

We always welcome memories at the Bishopthorpe Community Archive.  When lockdown has finished, please call in on any Monday afternoon 2.30 – 5.00pm, upstairs at the Village Hall or email:  historygroup@bishopthorpe.net

Linda Haywood

Latest Pandemic News from City of York Council

Stay at home this weekend
With good weather expected over the weekend, we have teamed up with North Yorkshire Police to stress the importance of staying home and following social distancing guidelines in York. The UK government advice is to stay local and use open spaces near to your home where possible.
    • do not travel unnecessarily
    • you can still go to the park for outdoor exercise once a day but only by yourself or within your household, not in groups
  • you should keep 2 metres apart from others outside your household at all times when outdoors
York has been highlighted nationally as one of the best cities whose residents and businesses to have most adhered to social distancing [according to data from Google].
How Age UK York are supporting residents, with the help of council volunteers
To help relieve pressure on emergency services, volunteers from the council together with Age UK York are driving discharged hospital patients home.
To help relieve pressure on the emergency services, 25 volunteers from the council’s pool of volunteers who matched Age UK York’s criteria have been deployed to join the charity’s Home from Hospital service and their existing two volunteer drivers.
Suitably experienced volunteers with no underlying health conditions and who aren’t medically-shielding, can opt to transport patients who have had Covid-19. They will use personal protection equipment (PPE) and extra hygiene measures which follow Government guidelines. This includes drivers using 1,800 disposable plastic car seat covers kindly donated by garages:
  • Stoneacre Ford York
  • Vantage Toyota York
  • Butts of Bawtry
  • Fulford Auto Services
Another example of the city coming together.
Air quality improvements
New data has revealed that York’s air pollution has significantly reduced during the Coronavirus lockdown as the majority of residents stay at home to protect the NHS and save lives.
The analysis shows improvements in air quality (nitrogen dioxide concentrations), compared to ‘business as usual’ figures, for specific areas of York, where the council undertakes regular air quality monitoring, including:
  • Fishergate: a reduction of 43 per cent
  • Fulford Road: a reduction of 28 per cent
  • Gillygate: a reduction of 29 per cent
  • Heworth Green: a reduction of 27 per cent
  • Holgate Road: a reduction of 32 per cent
  • Nunnery Lane: a reduction of 38 per cent
  • Lawrence Street: a reduction of 29 per cent
  • Bootham: a reduction of 16 per cent
Average nitrogen dioxide reduction across all York sites = 30 per cent.
Homelessness and housing update
We are providing accommodation for all homeless households and individuals in the city now and will continue to do so beyond this emergency, as we normally do.
In addition to using our own and partners’ hostel accommodation, we are currently supporting around 35 homeless households – a mix of families, couples and single people – in self-contained bed and breakfast or hotel accommodation offered to us during the emergency.
Depending on each individual’s level of need, single people or rough sleepers are housed in a mix of existing hostels and bed and breakfasts, and in hotel rooms – all in single rooms to allow social distancing and self-isolation.
All the rough sleepers we are supporting are already known to us and the vast majority have accepted the accommodation which each and every one is being offered. We continue to remind them of the lockdown’s requirements, and work hard to persuade them all to come into and stay in their accommodation.
Rough Sleeper services are operating in the usual way. For a bed, please go to 63, Lawrence Street or call 01904 416562 or at evenings or weekends please call 01609 780780.
We are continuing with our services for people who are concerned about becoming homeless and need our advice to help prevent homelessness. This is being done online or by phone on 01904 554500 or via www.york.gov.uk/homelessness/housing-options. These teams continue to help people facing homelessness through, for example, financial hardship, relationship breakdown or issues with private landlords. We’re also working with landlords across the city to support their tenants and minimise evictions. We’ve seen a slight rise in single people asking our preventative services for help which may be because they usually live with friends or family who now need to self-isolate.
We’re prioritising our work to prepare empty council homes ready to re-let and are finding private rented accommodation harder to come by at the moment. We plan to continue working with hotels and B&Bs for the duration of the lockdown to keep people safely accommodated and we are working on plans to ensure that as we move out of lockdown everyone will have accommodation options.
Where individuals do become homeless and sleep on the streets, we continue to offer tailored support. Whether it’s mental health support, dealing with drug or alcohol abuse, relationship breakdown or poverty, we try and help each individual into suitable accommodation and services. Once they start working with us and our partners in the city – like Changing Lives or the Salvation Army – we can address each person’s needs including getting benefits in place, training for work, money and tenancy management, before helping them into stable accommodation.
While we carry on with this work, we’ve had to be increasingly innovative about safely supporting rough sleepers – especially those with more complex needs or challenging behaviours – while also maintaining social distancing for other clients and our staff. Like all other services, we’re doing more by phone and are prioritising emergencies. With York CVS we are signposting the charities we work with, including SASH, Carecent and Changing Lives, to apply for additional funding for voluntary groups.

Virtual Dog Walk with Keep Your Pet

Make your dog a media star!

This is my idea of a virtual dog walk!

York-based ‘Keep your pet’ (KYP) is continuing to provide its valued service to pet owners, and will do so as long as sufficient of its amazing volunteers are available.

KYP volunteers and staff recognise how especially important the company and security of a pet can be at this time, not least in maintaining a routine and sense of normality. So far during the current crisis KYP, administered by Age UK York, has helped over 60 people.

However, having had to cancel its major fund-raising event of the year, the annual dog walk on the Knavesmire and other events, Keep Your Pet is instead asking people to join in a ‘virtual dog walk’.

Keep Your Pet clients, supporters and all other dog owners are invited to take part by submitting photographs of their dogs, with or without their owners, along with a minimum donation of £5 per entry.

Keep Your Pet will create a ‘dog walk gallery’ on its website, and photos will be submitted to the press.

Winning entrants will receive a virtual and (in time) a real rosette.

As with the traditional dog walk other activities are also on offer:

  • where entrants express an interest and supply an appropriate photo they can take part in the ‘owner and dog look-a-like’ competition
  • where a caption to the photo has been supplied there is entry into the caption competition
  • there is the opportunity to take part in a ‘guess the name of a puppy’ competition.

Whilst receiving a majority of its funds from Age UK York, Keep Your Pet cannot function at the current level without donations and fundraising events. Expenditure includes publicity & administration costs. Chair of KYP, Keith Martin said:

“We would love to see you at our virtual dog walk and we also welcome support for Keep Your Pet on a regular basis – details can be downloaded from the website here.   We are still hoping that the actual dog walk can be rearranged for September 2020.”

How to enter

Entries should be sent between 3rd and 10th May 2020 to kypfundraising@gmail.com. One photo of a dog with a suitable caption and/or one photo of owner and dog to enter the lookalike competition. Photos need to be in jpg format. In addition entrants can guess the name of the female puppy displayed on the Keep Your Pet website.

The details and conditions of the competition rules can be found at www.keepyourpet.co.uk

Entries will need to be accompanied by a minimum £5 donation. Donations can be made through PayPal on the website www.keepyourpet.co.uk or by cheque payable to Keep Your Pet and sent to: KYP Treasurer, 8 Cromwell Road, Bishophill, York, YO1 6DU. Name and address to be included so that receipt can be acknowledged.

The names of entrants need to be stated in the submission email. It will be assumed that there is approval for the picture to be posted online & published in the media unless otherwise stated. An address for the postage of rosettes should be included in the event of the entrant achieving one of the top three places.

Further information from: 07592547326 or kypfundraising@gmail.com and on the website www.keepyourpet.co.uk

Last year’s walk when we could all get together
Tommo looking smart
Oscar’s enjoying it

‘Keep your pet’ (KYP) helps older & vulnerable people in York and Selby by looking after their pets during times of medical or other emergency, so that they can return to caring for their pet when they have recovered.   KYP was launched in November 2012 by a partnership between RSPCA York & District, Age UK York, & Age UK Selby.   A team of local volunteers offers dog walking, pet fostering, feeding animals or transport to a vet.   A part-time organiser administers the scheme from the Age UK Priory Street office.

KYP works in three ways in that it benefits animals, their owners, & the volunteers, particularly those who are unable to keep an animal of their own but wish to have contact, or those whose own animals have recently died.

Geoff Dixon’s 1919 Peace Cup

Mr. Geoff Dixon serving a customer in the butcher’s shop, Main Street.

In August 1919, Bishopthorpe celebrated the peace following the First World War.  The Yorkshire Gazette reported the event in some detail describing how the children sat down at tables outside The Ebor and enjoyed a sumptuous tea.  They also received a souvenir of the occasion – a decorated Peace Mug.  Now, after many years, one of the original mugs has come to light.

Our late, well-known butcher, Mr. Geoff Dixon, was interviewed in 2001 by members of the Bishopthorpe Local History Group as part of their Oral History Project.  During the recording, Geoff revealed that he remembered the ‘Peace Tea’.  He was only five years old at the time and recalled a lot of people attended and that Mrs. Walter Paver organised it.  He surprised his interviewers when he told them that he still had the Peace Cup, as he called it, and searched it out to show it to them.

Earlier this year, I happened to read the transcription of that interview and wondered if the mug or cup, was still around.  Sadly, Geoff died in 2009, and so I went to see his nephew, Robert Dixon, in the butcher’s shop.  Robert told me, yes, he had the mug at home and would find it for me to photograph.

With thanks to Robert, the mug has now been recorded for the Bishopthorpe Community Archive and is displayed here for all to see.  The mug, which is now over 100 years old, is in good order without a chip or crack in sight.  The gold rim is just a little worn showing that Geoff must have occasionally enjoyed drinking tea from his memento.

The Peace Mug or Cup showing Admiral Beatty (left) and Field Marshal Haig.
The dates of the ‘Great War’ depicted on the reverse.

On one side of the mug the colourful illustration depicts the Admiral of the Fleet, David Beatty, and Field Marshal Douglas Haig, commander-in-chief of the British Expeditionary Force on the Western Front.  Sitting serenely between them is Britannia.

On the reverse the dates of both war and peace are recorded:

“Commenced Aug 4th 1914

Armistice Nov _1th 1918 (Note the number ‘1’ has faded.)

Peace Signed June 28th 1919″

 

To read further details about the 1919 peace celebrations in Bishopthorpe, follow the link here:

http://www.bishopthorpe.net/bishnet/history/2019/07/11/august-1919-bishopthorpe-celebrates-the-peace/

 

Linda Haywood

Bishopthorpe Community Archive

Bus Service Update

First Bus is now operating a reduced service on route 11.

From Bishopthorpe, there is a journey at 06-23, then at 07-20 and thereafter every 70 minutes to 19-00. Evening journeys are at 19-56, 20-35, 21-35 and 22-35.

The Saturday timetable starts at 07-20 and operates every 70 minutes until 19-00, and thereafter as weekdays.

Sunday Service 11S
First York’s website says this is operated by EYMS, which if correct is a new development. The EYMS site doesn’t seem to mention it.

A Saturday timetable will operate on Good Friday and Easter Saturday. Sunday timetable (if it exists) should apply on Easter Sunday and Monday.

York Pullman is operating only three journeys daily (Mon. – Sat.) timed at 08-35, 12-30 and 15-55 to York and at 11-34, 14-59 and 18-34 to Colton.

The current timetable is operating to ensure key workers, including health service and emergency workers, can get to and from their places of work and those without a car can still collect medical prescriptions or do their essential shopping.

The company is aware of the importance of maintaining services, but if further changes are necessary the details will be found on the First Bus Corona Virus web page.

The revised No 11 Timetables can be viewed and downloaded via these links:

Weekdays from 30th March 2020

Saturday from 4th April 2020

Passengers are asked to pay with cards rather than cash where possible, and to observe government advice regarding hand cleansing, use of handkerchiefs, etc.

Bishopthorpe Covid-19 Village Help Page

Local Services

 

Business Details
Ainsty Ales Home delivery & Drive through
Beadlam Grange Farm Shop Call (ext 3) to arrange delivery
Bish ‘n’ Chips Free delivery Tue-Sat if self-isolating
Burnholme Fisheries Delivery of fresh and frozen fish
Co-operative 7am to 10pm every day
Early Bird Milkman Milk and more
Fruitique Call 07801826279
Millies Grocery deliveries
Old Sun Inn Shop and takeaway
Pig And Pastry Call on 675115 if you are isolated and need supper
Scott Lock Emergency locksmith service
Tesco Priority access 9-10am, Mon,Wed,Fri
Treeboom Brewery Delivery and sales
Woodman Deliver soup on Wednesdays, but not open otherwise

Please pass on the details of all the shops in the above link who deliver to elderly neighbours who may not have the internet.
Remember to keep your distance when doing so.

For up-to-date details, please call in on
https://bishopthorpecorona.org/

Coronavirus Concerns

Lots of information and advice is available through the official channels, and there’s a whole load of correspondence and comments on the Bishopthorpe Community Facebook page.

However, we’re aware that not everyone uses Facebook so if you’re not on Facebook and there are items of local importance you think the community should be aware of, comments you’d like to make, or information you’d like to impart, please feel free to add your comments to this page.

 

 

 

 

Chart of shops offering special opening hours for special people.

No photo description available.

Bishopthorpe Community Archive – down but not out!

Regretfully, the Bishopthorpe Community Archive which is housed at Bishopthorpe Village Hall, will be closed until further notice, owing to the COVID-19 crisis.  In the meantime, if there are any Bishopthorpe history-related queries you are burning to have answered, please email us at historygroup@bishopthorpe.net

Just to cheer you up in this gloomy lock-down period here, from the Archive, is a reminder of a more convivial time when people were able to to gather together to enjoy themselves.  The following colourful images are of the festivities which took place in the village in 2002 to celebrate the Queen’s Golden Jubilee.

Bishopthorpe celebrates the Queen’s Golden Jubilee with a street party in 2002. [Photo: KL]
Bishopthorpe pensioners were treated to tea in the middle of Main Street. [Photo: L. Thornton]

 

 

 

 

 

Two of the many workers behind the scene: Margaret Storey and Muriel Wood. [Photo: L. Thornton]
The children also enjoyed a feast in the middle of Main Street. [Photo: L. Thornton]
 

The Fashion Show, held at The Marcia, was a big hit at the Golden Jubilee celebration. [Photo: KL]
The tug-of-war held on the Cricket Field. [Photo: J. Harris]
Archbishop Hope generously opened the Palace for the festivities. Here he relaxes in the 1950’s room which Bishopthorpe Local History Group created in the Great Hall. [Photo: H. Fountain]

Envir Agency Mtg Postponed

Please note that it is now impossible for the Environment Agency to attend the parish council meeting next week.
The two EA officers have been invited to the meeting on 24 March instead.

The next Parish Council meeting is on Tuesday 25 February, 19.00 in the village hall.
Kathy Stevenson, the Flood Risk Officer, and project manager Andrew Houston from the Environment Agency are planning to come along to provide us with a brief update on the Bishopthorpe flood relief scheme, and in particular to discuss opportunities for tree planting in the Bishopthorpe area.

They said that they very much hope for as little impact as possible for Bishopthorpe over the next few days but they are sure the community will work together whatever Storm Dennis has in store.
Please note that the latest river level and 36 hr forecast can be viewed on

https://flood-warning-information.service.gov.uk/station/8208

and will be also be available to you via Floodline. This forecast is subject to change significantly over the weekend as the impacts of Dennis and snow melt from the upper catchments are realised. Read more Envir Agency Mtg Postponed

Advice on Coronavirus from the Director of Public Health

The Director of Public Health for City of York has asked me to send the following message:
This is an update on the coronavirus situation in York as at 14:00 on Sunday 02 February. Please feel free to share this with your constituents who might find it helpful.
The key message is that there have not been any further cases. The risk from coronavirus to individuals living and working in York continues to be low and the City is a safe place to visit. We are operating business as usual.
The situation is being closely monitored and advice may change. The lead agency is Public Health England (PHE). City of York Council (CYC) is being advised by PHE and will respond accordingly. For the latest national updates please go to www.gov.uk/coronavirus.
The CYC communications team are working closely with the PHE communications team and are doing an excellent job in sharing PHE updates with our partners across the City including schools, universities and Make it York.
We are responding directly to any queries that come through to us through our established channels and signposting people to specialist information from PHE as appropriate. Information is available on the CYC website with links to useful advice and updates are also now being shared via twitter. I have done an interview with Radio York this morning and will be doing further interviews with local media over the coming days as further updates become available. PHE will be launching a national health promotion campaign shortly that will be aimed at the general public and we will, of course, be supporting this locally as well.
Since the 2 cases were confirmed in York last Friday I have been having daily conversations with PHE and with the Vale of York CCG representing York Hospital and GP practices. Our local NHS services are well prepared and are ready to respond as needed.
Similarly I am having regular internal meetings in CYC with key officers and council services are well prepared to respond if needed.
I have been impressed by how quickly PHE has stepped in to support the University of York and Staycity Aparthotel. As an outcome of the work that PHE has been doing to identify close contacts of these persons it has been confirmed that there are no close contacts at the University and any close contacts at the hotel have been identified and contacted by PHE. Therefore I can reassure you that the risk to students and to the general public in York from coronavirus is low. The University of York has a dedicated web page here www.york.ac.uk/alert
Close contacts are defined as individuals who have been within 2 metres of an infected person for a minimum of 15 minutes.
Current intelligence suggests that the coronavirus is behaving in a similar way to seasonal flu which we are all used to dealing with every winter. For the majority of people flu is an unpleasant infection which can take a week or so to recover from but it doesn’t cause any long lasting harm. The elderly and people with existing long term health conditions such as heart disease and chronic lung disease appear to be most at risk. The World Health Organisation and PHE are monitoring the situation in China and as more intelligence is gathered it will improve our understanding of the infection and how to prevent its spread.
There are basic steps that people can take to protect themselves from infection:
  • Wash your hands with soap and warm water regularly and always before eating. If soap and water is not available use alcohol based hand gel which can be bought in most supermarkets and community pharmacies
  • There is no clear evidence that wearing a face mask provides any protection so this is not recommended.
  • Catching coughs and sneezes is vitally important. People should use a paper issue, not their hands, make sure that their nose and mouth are completely covered so that no spray escapes and dispose of the tissue as soon as possible afterwards e.g. by flushing down the toilet. If no tissue is immediately available the advice is to sneeze into the inside of your elbow.
As things stand currently it is not necessary to introduce widespread infection control measures in York schools or other public buildings, including council buildings. I will be closely monitoring the situation and will take specialist advice from PHE as to whether this might be helpful if we should have an increase in the number of cases testing positive for the coronavirus.
The advice to individuals remains unchanged. If anyone has symptoms of the virus – feeling feverish, cough, shortness of breath and they are worried they may been in contact with someone who has the coronavirus – they should not visit A&E or their GP surgery since this may spread infection. Instead ask people to contact NHS 111 for further advice.