Orchard Project – October Newsletter

This is a Heritage Lottery funded project which aims to highlight Bishopthorpe’s orchard heritage and create a new community orchard for the village. The project runs from 1 November 2018 to 31 October 2019 and the grant award is £8,900. The project is being run by volunteers on behalf of the Parish Council.

This month the project is reaching its major milestones. The booklet “Bishopthorpe in Blossom” should be ready in time for the Apple Pressing day on 13 October. After that it will be available from the library, both on loan and for sale. Hours of research have revealed fascinating aspects of the history of fruit growing and market gardening in Bishopthorpe and the Archbishop’s walled garden, which has been brought together for the first time. For example, school log books from the 1800s record children regularly missing from school in summer to ‘pull fruit’ in the grounds and gardens around the village.

The community orchard site has been carefully tended over the summer to keep on top of the weeds and establish grasses and wildflowers. This month it will be planted up with fruit trees by the Bishopthorpe Scouts. Initially there will be 8 apples and 2 pears, with more to be added this winter, including plums and a gage.

We will be taking further samples of apples and pears to RHS Harlow Carr Apple Day for identification. There are a few varieties in Bishopthorpe which are very old, including the Hessle Pear, Balsam apple and Keswick Codlin apple. The Northern Fruit Group is interested in grafting some of these heritage varieties.

The funded part of the project finishes at the end of the month, but the project will continue with the help of volunteers. Thank you to everyone who has made the project a success! There will be a dedicated page on the Bishopthorpe Community website where we will provide information about the community orchard. We hope that you will enjoy the community orchard as it develops.

Orchard Project – September Newsletter

This is a Heritage Lottery funded project which aims to highlight Bishopthorpe’s orchard heritage and create a new community orchard for the village. The project runs from 1 November 2018 to 31 October 2019 and the grant award is £8,900. The project is being run by volunteers on behalf of the Parish Council.

Last month the project made a major purchase – an apple press for use at the annual village apple pressing event. Taking advice from the Otley Chevin orchard project, and looking at the presses they use, we decided on a traditional ‘rack and cloth screw press’. This is a large press which will be an attractive focal point for apple pressing and will enable the parish council to organise more than one event. We have also acquired a ‘scratter’ which grates the apples before they go into the press. Other purchases include a range of professional tools for pruning fruit trees, which can be loaned out to help with the management of old fruit trees in the village.

Work on the booklet ‘Bishopthorpe in Blossom’ has been completed and it goes to print this month. So much fascinating information has been uncovered about Bishopthorpe’s orchard heritage and we have had some lovely interviews with local residents and farmers. An amazing photograph has been discovered in the village archives showing the Bishopthorpe Palace walled garden, taken in 1949 from the top of St Andrews church tower. It shows the garden fully intact, with glasshouses and garden which extended well outside the current walls. Look out for this in the booklet, which will be available from the library in October!

We hope to take samples of apples to RHS Harlow Carr Apple Day in October for identification. If you have an old apple tree and are interested to know what variety it is, please get in touch and we may be able to include it.

The funded part of the project draws to a close next month with the planting of the trees in the community orchard. We would like to thank the many people who have helped make the project a success, in particular Linda Haywood (village archivist), Brunswick Organic Nursery, 1st Bishopthorpe Scouts, Bishopthorpe Playgroup, Ainsty Lawncare and Landscapes, Natural England, and the many local residents who have turned out to help at the community orchard site.

To contact the project please email bishorchard@yahoo.com or phone 07563 798408.

Orchard Project – July Newsletter

This is a Heritage Lottery funded project which aims to highlight Bishopthorpe’s orchard heritage and create a new community orchard for the village. The project runs from 1 November 2018 to 31 October 2019 and the grant award is £8,900. The project is being run by volunteers on behalf of the Parish Council.

We are now two-thirds of the way through the live phase of the project and are making great progress. Whilst we wait until autumn to plant the trees in the new orchard, we have been exploring the history of orchards in the village. The old maps reveal that a staggering proportion of ‘old’ Bishopthorpe was cultivated as orchards and market gardens. Comparing the maps from the mid-19th century to the present day shows just how many of these were built on during the 20th century. You may assume that the fruit trees were bull-dozed, but the reality might be far less severe. In several places we think that the builders left many of the original fruit trees untouched and many are still growing in gardens! Pear trees in particular, can live well over 100 years! If you live on Sim Balk Lane, Church Lane, Main Street, Copmanthorpe Lane, The Coppice or any of the adjoining streets, and have an old-looking fruit tree in your garden, then please get in touch with the project – your tree might be a remnant of an old orchard thought to be lost!

One area which we would love to know more about is the area previously known as ‘Moor Close’ on Copmanthorpe Lane, where The Coppice is today. A house called ‘Prospect House’ on the old maps was built there in the 1800s and the land was cultivated for many years as a market garden with fruit trees. Does anyone remember this part of the village before The Coppice housing estate was built on it in the 1960s?? It would be really interesting to know whether any fruit trees still existed at that time, or even remain in peoples’ gardens.

We would also love more information about the Archbishop’s walled garden on Bishopthorpe Road on the edge of the village. This spring we were fortunate to be allowed to visit, accompanied by gardeners from Brunswick Organic Nursery who keep it well tended. In its heyday the walled garden was the pride and joy of several Archbishops, supplying their households with abundant produce. It dates from about 1767 and has a long history of fruit growing; the old walls are pockmarked with nails from training espaliers. Several very old pear and plum trees are still present (from the outside you can see their blossom sticking up over the walls) and the tradition of fruit growing is in good hands, with over 50 fruit trees still present. Our research has revealed an account of a visit in 1827 by a German Prince. Archbishop Vernon Harcourt personally escorted him around the walled garden and the prince wrote a vivid account describing its magnificence, including mention of pineapples and grenadillas growing in the hot houses! There used to be some very grand glass houses on the south facing wall and an avenue of plum trees in what is now the farmer’s field. These should have been clearly visible from Church Lane. Although we know that they were in decline by the 1940’s, we have no idea when the glass houses were demolished. Does anyone have any information? Or even better a photo (no harm in asking!!).

Finally, of all the memories and stories that residents have shared with us, we are surprised that no one has owned up to scrumping from any of the local orchards!! We would love to hear these kinds of stories from your childhood. Please get in touch with any little detail for any of the above. Local history is the compilation of little details!

If any of the information above has piqued your interest, we are writing a booklet to describe the orchard heritage of Bishopthorpe. Keep an eye open for it in October!

To contact the project please email bishorchard@yahoo.com or phone 07563 798408.

A Mountfield petrol mower was left near the orchard site in April. If this was donated to the project, then thank you to whoever left it. If not, then please get in touch as we are keeping it safe!

What time is the bus to York?

The most recent (January 2020) changes to the timings of the No. 11 bus make journey planning complicated.
Instead of set times each hour, there are now variations all day.

So what was the 27 minutes past the hour service from Acaster Lane now leaves at 9:30, 10:31, 11:32, 12:34, 13:32, 14:33, 15:42, 16:43, 17:20, 18:22, 19:26, 20:35, 21:35, and 22:35

And the old 57 past service leaves at 9:58, 10:59, 12:03, 13:03, 14:03, 15:03, 16:13, 17:20, 17:54, 18:55 and 19:56

The service still runs approximately half hourly, but as the departure times vary through the day you need to check for each journey.

To make life more complicated, no printed timetables are available. Times are published on 1st York’s website and app, and can be downloaded through the following link:

Service 11 Monday to Friday, Saturday, and Sunday 11S

If you don’t have the facility to download, the helpful City of York Council staff at its tourist information facilities (e.g. in York Station) will download a copy for you.

 

Bus Service Changes

New Timetables

First York have introduced new timetables for the 11 and 11S services effective from December 2019. The service 11 changes seem to be mostly adjustments to time allowances for the journey between The Stonebow and York Station, to take account of traffic conditions and crew changes. Timings from Stonebow are largely unchanged, but Station departure times vary by a few minutes with times at other stops to Bishopthorpe also adjusted to match. This results in the timings of services at the terminus on Acaster Lane being harder to memorise, as they’re no longer a regular ‘x minutes past and y minutes to the hour’. Evening services have been adjusted so the first bus to do the South Bank loop on the way to York is now not until 19:26.

The timetables can viewed using these links:

Service 11 Monday to Friday
Service 11 Saturday

The Sunday service has been renamed from 500 to 11S, to make it more obvious to users of the number 11 that it’s the Sunday version of that service and travels between York and Bishopthorpe.

The timetable can be viewed here:

11S Sunday

Christmas changes

As usual, the No. 11 service changes during the Christmas holiday period.

  • There will be no buses on Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day.
  • Services will cease early evening on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve.
  • On other weekdays and on Saturdays during the holiday period the Saturday
    timetable will operate.
  • Park and Ride services will operate on Boxing Day.

The 21 service (Colton -York via Bishopthorpe) does not operate on Sundays or Bank
Holidays.

The Lost Men of Bishopthorpe

Finding their Stories

Ken Haywood’s book telling the stories of the men who are commemorated on Bishopthorpe’s War Memorial was published in November, 2017.

In the process of completing the research on the men, Ken became aware of a number of other Bishopthorpe men from both wars who died as a result of service with the Forces but who were not commemorated on the village memorial.

As a result of the publication of ‘The Lost Men of Bishopthorpe’, the Parish Council committed to adding the additional names to the War Memorial by the time of the centenary of the end of the First World War in November last year. The work took place in the second part of October, 2018, and the work was completed in time for Remembrance Sunday on the 11th November.

However, the story of one man, whose name was added to the memorial in 2018, does not feature in ‘Lost Men’.
Second Lieutenant Wilfrid Mervyn Dunnington-Jefferson was killed in action with 3 Battalion, The Royal Fusiliers on 25/26 April, 1915, during the Second Battle of Ypres. He is commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the Missing in Ypres.

Ken did not find references to 2nd Lt. Dunnington-Jefferson until the middle of 2018, well after ‘Lost Men’ was published, but just in time for Wilfrid Mervyn’s name to be added to the Memorial with the other new names.

Much more recently, Ken managed to contact Nicky Dunnington-Jefferson. She is Wilfrid’s niece and was very pleased to hear that he was now commemorated on Bishopthorpe’s War Memorial. Nicky has lived in London for many years, but, as luck would have it, she was about to visit Yorkshire just after Ken established contact. In early August, Ken and Linda met Nicky at Middlethorpe Hall, where Wilfrid was born, then took her to see the War Memorial. Stewart Harrison, Parish Council Chairman, came along to meet Nicky, who was effusive in her appreciation of what the Parish Council had achieved.

 

Wilfrid Mervyn Dunnington-Jefferson’s name in the middle of the new panel on Bishopthorpe War Memorial.

 

Ken and Stewart point out her Uncle Wilfrid’s name to Nicky Dunnington-Jefferson.

The Lost Men of Bishopthorpe, price £10+£2 p&p [in UK], can be obtained directly from Ken at 39 Acaster Lane, Bishopthorpe, York, YO23 2SA
Tel. 01904 704584

Bus Service Changes

From 02 Sept. service 21 will be operated by York Pullman.
Timings from Bishopthorpe will be 5 mins. later than at present, except for the 08:25.
The main change will be at the York end of the route; the 21 will no longer go via Stonebow to Foss Bank but will start/terminate on Piccadilly. This will inconvenience folk who have used this bus to reach the supermarkets, but hopefully the shorter route will make punctual running easier to achieve.

Bank Holiday Monday.
The First bus website is silent on the topic, but a journey timing search indicates that as usual on bank holidays the No. 11 will be replaced by our Sunday bus (service 500) and timetable.

The Folly Flâneuse Visits Bishopthorpe

The Folly Flâneuse visited the old church by the river at Bishopthorpe recently and found a new item for her blog.  What is this about?  Well, the blog is described as “Rambles to, and ramblings about, follies and landscape buildings.”   Click on this link to find out:

https://thefollyflaneuse.com/st-andrews-old-church-facade-bishopthorpe-yorkshire/

Don’t forget to explore the rest of the site where Flâneuse explores  follies from many parts of the UK.

 

 

Orchard Project – May/June Updates and Newsletter

Bishopthorpe Community Orchard and Heritage project

This is a Heritage Lottery funded project which aims to highlight Bishopthorpe’s orchard heritage and create a new community orchard for the village. The project runs from 1 November 2018 to 31 October 2019 and the grant award is £8,900. The project is being run by volunteers on behalf of the Parish Council.

The community orchard site, on the edge of Ferry Lane playing field, has now changed beyond recognition!

It has been fenced and carefully prepared with the help of many keen volunteers and with guidance from Jonathon Short of Ainsty Landscapes, and has been sown with a mix of native perennial wildflowers and grass seed. It is very difficult to create a wildflower meadow, as wildflowers quickly get overtaken by grasses on fertile soils. But we are hoping a few wildflowers will grow: species like knapweed, ox eye daisy, yarrow, common cat’s ear, self-heal, red clover and vetch, which are a bit more robust. Yellow rattle will also help keep the grasses in check. In the first year we are not expecting any to flower, as the site will need to be cut regularly to keep on top of the flush of weeds – in particular Himalayan balsam which is abundant on this site. Himalayan balsam is actually not too difficult to get rid of as it is an annual species and seeds only survive for about 3 years in the soil. Last year it was hand pulled before it seeded, so only 2 years to go!

The orchard is big enough to fit in about 16 ‘half standard’ fruit trees, which will eventually grow to a height of about 4 metres. The Heritage Lottery grant requires 10 trees to be planted by the end of October, when the project ends. This is not great timing for planting fruit trees which are supplied as ‘bare root’. However, we have found a way round it by buying 1-year old trees this winter from Roger’s Nursery in Pickering and potting them up. They will be looked after by Brunswick Organic Nursery over the summer.

There has been a lot of interest in the varieties of old fruit trees found in the village, and we are keen for the new trees to reflect that (as well as be tasty to eat!). The varieties we have bought are:

Apples:

  • Ellison’s Orange
  • Lord Lambourne
  • Peasgood Nonsuch
  • Belle de Boskoop
  • James Grieve
  • Worcester Permain
  • Discovery
  • Katy

Pears:

  • Beurre Hardy
  • Concorde

This leaves scope for about 6 more, which may well include some plums. This time next year the first blossom should be showing!

For more information about the project, including the newsletter and forthcoming events, please visit www.bishopthorpe.net. To contact the project please email bishorchard@yahoo.com or phone 07563 798408.

You can read the June Newsletter here

 

Bishopthorpe Sub-Post Office

The Bishopthorpe Sub-Post Office will close on 15 July 2019 when Supernews on Sim Balk Lane changes hands to the new owners.
It’s believed that the PO business will transfer to the new owners but there will be a (hopefully very short) period without a service.
Details are in the link below.
https://www.postofficeviews.co.uk/national-consultation-team/bishopthorpe-yo23-2qq-376349/

Active Adventures for under-5s in Bishopthorpe

Banish the Monday blues by racing unicorns, flying to the moon or joining the circus!

‘Magical Adventures’ is an active adventure class for 13 month – 4 year olds taking place at St Andrew’s Church Hall, Bishopthorpe on Monday mornings at 10am.

Jump on board the ‘Magical Adventures train’ for a different adventure destination every week, incorporating sensory activities, dance, music, imaginary play and structured games.

Separate classes at 10.50am for 3 – 4 year olds give them the opportunity to build their confidence and independence in a more challenging class, whilst still having lots of fun!

Sam Squirrel, the ‘Magical Adventures’ train driver mascot looks forward to welcoming you to a class very soon! For more information please visit www.magicaladventures.co.uk or email
lyndsay@magicaladventures.co.uk

Photo by www.joyphotography.org.uk
Photo by www.joyphotography.org.uk

 

 

Village Gala

Don’t forget that Saturday 15th June is Village Gala Day in the Palace grounds, midday to 4pm.
Lots of stalls with music, dancing, magic, crafts, food and drink, and more.
A lovely family day out.
£2 for adults, free for children under 12 accompanied by an adult.

Rag Rugging – Recycling with Panache

Ebor Ruggers are The York Rag Rugging Group, running since 1995 and now meeting every month in St Andrew’s Church Hall in Bishopthorpe.

Now elevated to an art form, subtle and stylish, colourful and cheerful, the humble rag rug that used to cover earth floors carries recycling into the 21st century. Upcycled into wall hangings and many other decorative and useful items, the end product is as exciting as the creative imagination that inspires it.
We are a friendly and welcoming group, of varying abilities. We meet on the first Saturday of each month in Bishopthorpe and would love to see you whether you are a beginner or have experience.

Take a look at our website www.eborruggers.com or check out our Facebook page – Ebor Ruggers – for more details.

You can get in touch with us at eborruggersinfo@gmail.com